A Comprehensive Guide to Bike Riding at the Beach

Cycling is a great way to get exercise and enjoy the outdoors. It can even be done for transportation. But on a bike ride, you also have to keep an eye out for other beachgoers who may not share your love of cycling.

The best bike rides are on bicycle paths, which are less crowded than trails, streets, or paved beaches.

The Beach Path

If you’re going to ride on a bicycle path, it’s best to know where it is. On Long Island, we have the North Shore Bike Path, which is about 4 miles long and runs from Riverhead to Orient Point beaches with hiking trails.

If you’re interested in riding further north than that, try looking for a bike path near your home or work. Of course, if you’re not in Long Island and are looking for a bike path closer to you, be sure to read up on the rules of the road before taking off!

The Bike Route

The best bike rides are on bicycle paths, which are less crowded than trails, streets, or paved beaches. Here’s what you need to know before heading out:

  • Riding in the sand is unavoidably abrasive on all the parts of your bike that touch the ground, so try to take it easy if you’re riding in sand or dirt.
  • If you’re going to ride in wet sand, use a coaster brake (not just your hand brake) to slow down and stop quickly when needed.
  • Always bring extra gear with you since things like brakes and gears will wear out more quickly on a beach ride than on city streets
  • Don’t forget that it’s important to save energy and avoid pedaling up steep hills if at all possible.

Special Considerations for Riding on the Beach

  • There’s a bike path on the beaches in Manly, Cronulla, and Woolooware.
  • Remember that riding on sand is unavoidably abrasive on all parts of your bike that touch the ground, so try to take it easy if you’re riding in sand or dirt.
  • Don’t forget that it’s important to save energy and avoid pedaling up steep hills if at all possible.

Riding in a Group

One way to have a great time on a bike ride is riding in a group. This makes it easier to share the work of pedaling and also provides some company if you’re feeling like you need to break away from the pack. It’s also just more fun when there are more people.

And the best part is that groups can be composed of members of all fitness levels, so don’t worry about being left behind.

Gear and Safety Tips

  • When you’re riding on a beach, carry tire irons and a spare tube to help you change a flat.
  • If you need to walk your bike up or down steep hills, try using your bike’s kickstand as an alternative.
  • A small bell will help others know that you’re coming from a distance and make sure people get out of the way if you have to stop for any reason.

Always Wear a Helmet. – Don’t Rely on Your Brakes, Use a Coaster Brake. – Be Prepared for Sand With Extra Gear.

Riding in the sand can be abrasive, so use a coaster brake to slow down and stop quickly when needed. Always wear a helmet. Remember to save energy and avoid pedaling up steep hills if at all possible. If you need to, carry extra gear with you.

______________________________________________________

 

    SUBSCRIBE TO BIKE HACKS NEWS

    Want the best cycling experience?
    Sign up for the latest bikes, gear, and accessories reviews out there.


    By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy
    and European users agree to the data transfer policy

    Some other articles you might find of interest:

    See how bike riding makes its mark among other outdoor activities:

    How Bike Riding Compares to Other Popular Outdoor Activities

    Make a bike stand on your own with these tips:

    How to Easily Build a Bike Stand – 3 Methods Compares

    Ride bike comfortably and safely with these tips:

    Best Tips for a Safer Summer Bike Rides: Ways to Stay Healthy and Clothing to Wear

    About the author
    A Comprehensive Guide to Bike Riding at the Beach — Bike Hacks