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10/31/2013

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Mike

I would try to stick lights to my fenders.

Peter

Devil horns for your helmet is all I can think of.

James

Tons of stuff people have done with Sugru on their bikes at "instructables". Love that site....

http://www.instructables.com/tag/type-id/?sort=none&q=sugru+bike

Jon Webb

I broke the rear-view mirror off my helmet at the hinge where it attaches to the flexible bar that connects the helmet. This stuff would have helped with the repair. Just wrap it around the hinge and the base of the mirror. Neater than what I did with epoxy and aluminum support.
It would also work well as a gasket around some holes I drilled to do internal wiring on my bike in the seat tube and steerer tube in my fork. And you could probably use it to make a custom mount for things like tube repair kits and tire irons on the saddle rails, hiding them.
If it really works as described in the packaging it sounds like a pretty good way to fix lots of little problems.

Paul S

I've used it on my bike to cover a sharp brake cable holder that got in the way when I carried my bike up stairs.

It's the rear one in this generic image.

http://img1.findthebest.com/sites/default/files/975/media/images/2012_Masi_Fixed_Drop_257374.jpg

Ron Ablang

Does anyone know if this stuff works better than SuperGlue for plastic, wood, etc?

Chris

Ron:
This stuff is for a very different use than SuperGlue. Sugru will take up space, and is good for creating seals, and places you want to put some silicone rubber. And, yes, it does adhere to most surfaces, but is generally removable, it will tear from the surface if given sufficient force. Superglue is more for a permanent bond that takes up no space. Both do use moisture from the air to cure.

Ohio Shawn

I've got a iPhone recharger cable that is falling apart right at the usb connector, I would use it to repair that. As for my bike, looks like I could use some of it on my DIY bike repair stand to create some cushion on the bottom bracket holder and avoid scratching the finish. Also, could put a thin layer inside some of my handlebar mounts and act as better shims than some of the ones I have, I get the feeling this would be more friction-y and they would move around less.

Cutbert

How about an internal, temporary patch for a sidewall tear in your tire?

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